One Year, Twelve Books

No, that doesn’t mean I’ll be writing twelve stories over the next twelve months though that is definitely an interesting idea. I’ll save that for another time.

I’m on a mission this year, to knock off some of the books on my TBR that I’ve wanted to read for ages and have just never ‘found the time’ or had the courage to dive into.

I have a terrible habit of taking out books from the library and neglecting the stuff I actually own. So I figured I’d assign a book to each month, and divide it evenly between my science fiction and fantasy.

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NaNo 2019 Project: “Crystallia” Moodboard & Synopsis

I figure it’s about time I actually tell you what I’m writing about during November, huh?

I think I mentioned this before, but I’m writing an adult high fantasy novel for NaNoWriMo, only I’m doing it a little differently from most. Essentially I want to see if I can write a solid story with a fleshed-out fantasy world in a much shorter format. I’m talking a completed novel in about 50,000 words. Which seems like a lot, and it’s technically the goal for NaNoWriMo, but it’s not very much for a fantasy novel.

I expect it to be around 17 to 20 chapters, and I’m just trying to have fun with it, really. I wanted it to be a stress-free and fun sort of candy-project. Just fun for me to write, and a way for me to practice and play around with ideas I wouldn’t normally attempt. Of course, I don’t know how to have fun anymore and I’m taking it way too seriously, but I’ll save that for tomorrow’s week one wrap up.

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WIP Moodboard: The Wolves of the Far North

I love moodboards and aesthetics, okay? Going to call myself out right away, because you’ll probably see a lot more of these.

But they’re not just nice to look at – they can be really useful, too! When you only have a handful of images to convey your idea, you really have to think about what elements are important, how they express the look or capture the overall tone. Each image you choose is important.

And since I’m in the middle of edits for this novel, I figured it would be a good creative exercise to condense the concept behind it into only 9 images.

If you don’t know, The Wolves of the Far North is the novel I finished at the beginning of this year and I finally started my first round of edits this summer. It’s a YA fantasy novel, about two sisters who are rivals competing for membership in an elite group of warriors that protect their village, and what happens to that elite group, their village, and their relationship with each other when the South invades their territory.

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5 Songs from My Writing Playlist: The Wolves of the Far North

Doing something a little different for this little listicle. If you’re new here, hello! I’m Alyssa, your host, an author of fantasy and science fiction, and I felt like sharing a little more about my work in progress today.

Since the middle of last year, I’ve been writing a YA High Fantasy I’ve tentatively titled The Wolves of the Far North. I go into it a lot more in this post where I explain the plot and where the idea came from, so I’m not going to rehash it here. But I will say that it’s a Nordic-inspired fantasy about the rivalry between two sisters fighting for the honour to join the same order of warriors. It has lots of strange, natural magic, deep culture and lore because that stuff is so much fun, and takes place in a harsh cold climate. It’s so different from anything I’ve written before and it’s been so much fun to explore worldbuilding on a much smaller scale.

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Building the Far North: How I Build a Fictional World

When I started this series of blog posts on worldbuilding, I gave a fairly brief introduction of how I defined it, why it was important, and how I go about the process, and then I attempted to create a worksheet based around that.

Of course, up until that point no such worksheet existed. It was a method that existed only in my mind. And the worksheet was an attempt to distill that process into a few simple questions that would hopefully work the same for anyone who happened to use it.

But how did I know it actually worked?

Naturally, the next logical step would be to use it myself. How better to explain my process than with a page by page demonstration using the worksheet I created?

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